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Myopia Management

What is Myopia?

Myopia or nearsightedness is a common vision condition that tends to begin in childhood or teenage years. When light does not focus on the correct spot in the back of the eye, a blurry image is perceived. This can make distance viewing, such as seeing the board at school, playing sports, and watching TV, more difficult. Myopic individuals may compensate by squinting or moving closer to see clearly.

Who is at Risk for Myopia?

Current research suggests that both genetics and some environmental/behavioural factors can contribute to the development of myopia. Reduced time spent outdoors and increased near work are linked to increased myopia rates.

 

A CHILD WITH MYOPIC PARENTS HAS 3X THE CHANCE OF DEVELOPING MYOPIA VS. ONE WITH PARENTS WHO ARE NOT MYOPIC

Why is Higher Myopia a Problem?

When children develop myopia, their eyeball length continues to increase  over time until their mid to late teens. The increased stretching can cause physical changes that lead to  a higher risk for eye diseases later in life, such as myopic degeneration, retinal detachments, and glaucoma. Higher levels of myopia also require glasses that have thicker and heavier lenses.

What Can Be Done?

There are several ways to slow the rate of myopia progression during the critical developmental years. Myopia control is about improving one's quality of life. The following are a list of effective and approved methods to curb myopic changes:

  • Specialized eyeglasses lenses (MiyoSmart and MyoVision)

 

  • Daily disposable soft contact lenses (MiSight) 

 

  • Prescription Atropine eye drops

 

  • Rigid contact lenses (orthokeratology)

 

These treatments will not reverse existing myopia and may not completely stop further myopia development,  but are aimed at slowing the rate of progression. The treatment often lasts over several years until a stable prescription is achieved.